globe
  1. Main texts for the module 2 items
    1. Social psychology and discourse: An introduction - Andrew McKinlay, Chris McVittie 2008

      Book Essential

    2. Identities in context: Individuals and discourse in action - Andrew McKinlay, Chris McVittie 2011

      Book Essential

  2. Seminar 1: Social Psychology & Everyday Life/Discursive Psychology 5 items
    Key questions: 1. What was the 'crisis' in social psychology? 2. How has social psychology developed since the mid 20th century? 3. What arguments do writers offer for studying discourse as the primary site of social psychology? 4. What features of discourse are of greatest interest to the social psychologist?
    1. Read before you come to class 1 item
    2. Further reading 4 items
      1. Social psychology as history. - Kenneth J. Gergen 1973

        Article Recommended

  3. Seminar 2: The Self 5 items
    Key questions: 1. How have mainstream approaches to the self developed? 2. What assumptions are built into these approaches? 3. How does critical social psychological research understand the self? 4. How can constructions of the self be seen in discourse and social interaction?
    1. Read before you come to class 1 item
      1. The Self - Chris McVittie, Andy McKinlay

        Chapter Essential

    2. Further reading 4 items
  4. Seminar 3: Categorisations and Social Identities 6 items
    Key questions: 1. What processes are involved in the construction and negotiation of a social identity? 2. How and to what effect can identities be developed and reworked? 3. How and to what effect do individuals claim or resist the identities that are available?
    1. Read before you come to class 2 items
      1. Identities in context: individuals and discourse in action - Andrew McKinlay, Chris McVittie 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential Read chapter 1

    2. Further reading 4 items
  5. Seminar 4: Nations and National Identities 6 items
    Key questions: 1. How are nations constructed in discourse? 2. How is prejudice bound up with language? 3. Can egalitarian discourse be used to justify social inequalities?
    1. Read before you come to class 2 items
    2. Further reading 4 items
  6. Seminar 5: Discourse and Prejudice 6 items
    Key questions: 1. How do individuals attend to possible accusations of being prejudiced in their talk? 2. How do people account for outcomes that appear discriminatory? 3. How can discourse be used to present issues of inequality as inevitable or as outcomes of processes that appear equitable?
    1. Read before coming to class 1 item
    2. Further reading 5 items
      1. Attitudes and Attributions - Chris McVittie, Andy McKinlay

        Chapter Recommended

      2. Committed to (un)equal opportunities?: ‘New ageism’ and the older worker - Chris McVittie, Andy McKinlay, Sue Widdicombe 2003

        Article Recommended

  7. Seminar 6: Applying Social Psychology: Work and Organisations 5 items
    Key questions: 1. How do individual interactions relate to organisational practices? 2. How do organisations account for practices of inclusion or exclusion? 3. How do organisations negotiate their meanings in relation to other social groups and individuals?
    1. Read before coming to class 1 item
    2. Further reading 4 items
  8. Seminar 7: Applying Social Psychology: Health and Illness 6 items
    Key questions: 1. How are questions of health and illness negotiated or contested? 2. How do health professionals make sense of their practice? 3. What are the implications of these communications for how we understand particular conditions?
    1. Read before coming to class 1 item
    2. Further reading 5 items
      1. Masculinities and Health: Whose Identities, Whose Constructions? - Chris McVittie, Julie Hepworth, Karen Goodall

        Chapter Recommended

  9. Seminar 8: Applying Social Psychology: Asylum-Seekers and Refugees 5 items
    Key questions: 1. How do asylum-seekers seek to identify themselves as entitled to be in the UK? 2. How do some UK residents argue against the presence of asylum-seekers and refugees? 3. In what ways is integration constructed and what functions do these constructions achieve?
    1. Read before coming to class 1 item
      1. Conclusion - Steve Kirkwood, Simon Goodman, Chris McVittie, Andy McKinlay

        Chapter Essential

    2. Further reading 4 items
  10. Seminar 9: Applying Social Psychology: Peace, Violence and Beyond 5 items
    1. Read me before coming to class 1 item
      Key questions: 1. How can violent actions be constructed as unexceptional? 2. In what ways are potentially accountable social actions linked to the identities of those involved? 3. How can social groups external to the immediate context be used to justify current actions?
    2. Further reading 4 items
  11. Supplementary resources 9 items
    1. Identities in talk - Charles Antaki, Sue Widdicombe 1998

      Book Background

    2. Social psychology: traditional and critical perspectives - Paul Dickerson 2012

      Book Background

    3. The Language of Asylum: Refugees and Discourse - Steve Kirkwood, Simon Goodman, Chris McVittie, Andy McKinlay 2016 (electronic resource)

      Book Background

    4. Discourse and social psychology: beyond attitudes and behaviour - Jonathan Potter, Margaret Wetherell c1987

      Book Background

    5. Social Psychology - Wendy Stainton Rogers 2011 (electronic resource)

      Book Background

    6. Mapping the language of racism: discourse and the legitimation of exploitation - Margaret Wetherell, Jonathan Potter c1992

      Book Background

    7. The language of youth subcultures: social identity in action - Sue Widdicombe, Robin Wooffitt 1995

      Book Background

  12. Additional scans 2 items
    1. Revision and exams - Cottrell, Stella

      Chapter  Module: X3031 (Scanned Extract)